Vagabon

Vagabon

Nnamdi Ogbonnaya, Alfred, Erik Phillips

Wed, October 11, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is 18 and over

Vagabon
Vagabon
Vagabon is the project of guitarist and singer Lætitia Tamko, currently accompanied by Elise Okusami on drums and Eva Lawitts on bass. Vagabon's debut EP, Persian Garden, was released late 2014 on Miscreant Records. According to DIY magazine, "Vagabon finds various ways to flood the senses. It'll either come in a harrowing lyric that sticks in the conscience, or it'll arrive from a soft drone that gradually envelops." so it must be true.
Nnamdi Ogbonnaya
Nnamdi Ogbonnaya
NNAMDI OGBONNAYA is a multi-instrumentalist composer, producer, and performer in Chicago. He plays a variety of roles in numerous projects that span genres. Nnamdi has toured extensively with bands in the U.S.A., Mexico, Canada, and Europe. He releases solo music under his own name, and often performs as Nnamdi's Sooper Dooper Secret Side Project. His music combines hip-hop, math, gospel, and jazz, and is often delivered with a sense of satire that can be just as critical as it is humorous.
Alfred
Alfred
So Sensitive carries on Alfred’s artistic goals and emanates his authenticity as a person who has come to terms with the balance and flow of emotional needs in himself and others.

Self-described as a ‘queer rap scallion’, Alfred., whose real name is Aaron Brown, strives to open up hip-hop spaces to explore and celebrate more than than the typical cis-masculine heteronormativity.

Originally from Woodbridge, Brown was introduced to Richmond’s hip-hop scenes when he began attending VCU. Born to a Black father and a Filipina mother, Brown lives in the (often underlooked and underrepresented) racial intersections of a Black Asian person.

“Being Black and Filipino… can be confusing by the principle of being bi-racial,” Brown said. “More often than not, I come across different bouts of anti-blackness in some non-black POC communities and although a lot of microaggressions aren’t always intentional, [I’d] rather save my breath than delve further.”

The rapper identifies as queer, a label many identify with as the antithesis of heterosexuality and cisnormativity. Brown uses the pronouns he/him and they/them. (I will be using he/him pronouns throughout this piece for consistency and clarity).

“I don’t really know— I’ve always just said I was ‘queer’,” Brown said. “Just ’cause I know I don’t really have one specific deeply rooted preference, but I definitely didn’t think I was straight growing up.”

The rapper said that he experiences anti-blackness and queerphobia in many non-black POC and nonqueer spaces, while not to a point where he feels unsafe, it’s enough to not feel welcome.

“I think education is a process (and is accessible), but trying to bridge understanding for those who aren’t willing to openly receive is tiring and I’d rather let my work help begin to bridge communication with others,” he said.

Like many queer and trans people and especially individuals of color, keeping their queerness —which can be a huge part of their identity— a secret from conservative, traditional (and often nosy) family members can not only be frustrating, but also stifling to their growth.
Erik Phillips
Erik Phillips
Venue Information:
Strange Matter
929 West Grace Street
Richmond, VA, 23220
http://strangematterrva.com/